CED BACKGROUND
Developed by the Radio Corporation of America (RCA), and launched in March 1981, CED was one of the 'big three' consumer videodisc formats. The format was reasonably successful in North America but had little, if any, success in the United Kingdom and Australia (the only other territories to get a CED release). As a consequence of the failure of CED to meet consumer-base targets, RCA formally ended production of CED hardware in April 1984.

HOW CED WORKED
The CED sytem utilised a system akin to vinyl-record turntables insofar as a stylus physically tracked a groove on a disc.

CED DISCS
Due to inherent physical fragilities, CED platters were housed in a plastic outer caddy; when inserted into a CED player, an internal mechanism would extract the disc into the player and eject the caddy. Initially, CED provided monaural audio but ongoing development saw the introduction of two-channel stereo audio (from which surround channels could be extracted by a Dolby-equipped processor, if the 2-channel audio track was so encoded).

COST OF CED MOVIES
Accommodating 60-70mins of video per-side, CED discs retailed at between US$14.98 and US$39.98 for single-disc titles, and between US$34.98 and US$39.98 for 2-disc titles.

007 ON CED
All James Bond titles up to an including A View To A Kill received a CED release with the majority sporting artwork unique to the format. The first 007 CED release was Goldfinger (May 1981). Eon-produced titles were distributed by RCA, MGM/UA Home Video, and CBS-Fox Video. Never Say Never Again was marketed by Warner Home Video. A PAL edition of Goldfinger was issued in the U.K. by MGM/UA Home Video.
FOR A MORE DETAILED APPRECIATION OF THE CED FORMAT PLEASE VISIT CED MAGIC (LINK OPENS IN A NEW BROWSER WINDOW)